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Carole Terry’s career as an international performer and teacher of organ and harpsichord has taken her to many cities and universities throughout the United States, Europe, and the Far East. Especially known for her performances and recordings of German Romantic music, she is also an expert on the physiology of keyboard performance—a field in which she is preparing a major publication. A recent recording, Carole Terry in Schwerin, is a two-CD set of German-Romantic organ music recorded on the notable 1871 Ladegast organ at Schwerin Cathedral, Germany.

In the United States, Terry has participated in such conferences and seminars such as Westfield Center, the Historical Organ in America, the Oregon Bach Festival, the San Anselmo Organ Festival, and the Montreat Worship and Music Conference in North Carolina. In addition, she has been a featured recitalist at many conventions and conferences of the American Guild of Organists.

As Resident Organist and Curator for the Seattle Symphony from 2000 to 2003, Terry inaugurated the new C. B. Fisk organ in Seattle’s acclaimed Benaroya Hall, and played many solo concerts in addition to monumental works for organ and orchestra. Carole Terry is professor of organ and harpsichord at the University of Washington's School of Music, in Seattle.
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Carole Terry plays the Watjen Concert Organ Carole Terry in Schwerin
The first solo recording of the Watjen Concert Organ at Seattle’s Benaroya Hall!  Carole Terry puts the new Fisk organ through its paces in a varied program of works by Mendelssohn, Sweelinck, Bach, Albright, Stanley, Schumann, Vierne
and Widor.

“Carole Terry is a musician's musician who plays with great elegance, but also, when needed, with fire.” — THE AMERICAN ORGANIST
The 1871 84-rank Ladegast organ in the Schwerin Cathedral is the quintessential instrument for this splendid 2-CD set. The favored organ builder of Liszt and Ruebke, this is the largest Ladegast still in existance -- and it is in original condition. Enhanced by cathedral acoustics, this is perhaps the finest venue in the world for 19th century German organworks.
   
 
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